Posh Photography.

Posh Photography.

(via fancyspice)

habitfaitlemoine:

I need the American Flag pair. I’m done posting Chubbies now. sorry.

afvan:

'Hedi Goes West' by Hedi Slimane for Vogue Hommes Japan, 2009.

(via mer-cu-ri-al)

(Source: necrophilofthefuture, via thefairest-snowwhite)

nintend-hoe-art:

Gengar! (requested anonymously)

nintend-hoe-art:

Gengar! (requested anonymously)

(via minkses)

neurosciencestuff:

The Yin and Yang of Overcoming Cocaine Addiction
Yaoying Ma says that biology, by nature, has a yin and a yang—a push and a pull.
Addiction, particularly relapse, she finds, is no exception.
Ma is a research associate in the lab of Yan Dong, assistant professor of neuroscience in the University of Pittsburgh’s Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences. She is the lead author of a paper published online today in the journal Neuron that posits that it may be possible to ramp up an intrinsic anti-addiction response as a means to fight cocaine relapse and keep the wolves of relapse at bay.
This paper is the first to establish the existence of a brain circuitry that resists a relapse of cocaine use through a naturally occurring neural remodeling with “silent synapses.”
The work is a follow-up on a recent study conducted by Dong and his colleagues, which was published in Nature Neuroscience last November. The team used rat models to examine the effects of cocaine self-administration and withdrawal on nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens, a small region in the brain that is commonly associated with reward, emotion, motivation, and addiction. Specifically, they investigated the roles of synapses—the structures at the ends of nerve cells that relay signals.
The team reported in its Nature Neuroscience study that when a rat uses cocaine, some immature synapses are generated, which are called “silent synapses” because they are semifunctional and send few signals under normal physiological conditions. After that rat stops using cocaine, these “silent synapses” go through a maturation phase and acquire their full function to send signals. Once they can send signals, the synapses will send craving signals for cocaine if the rat is exposed to cues previously associated with the drug.
The current Neuron paper shows that there’s another side of “silent synapse” remodeling. Silent synapses that are generated in a specific cortical projection to the nucleus accumbens by cocaine exposure become “unsilenced” after cocaine withdrawal, resulting in a profound remodeling of this cortical projection. Additional experiments show that silent synapse-based remodeling of this cortical projection decreases cocaine craving. Importantly, this anti-relapse circuitry remodeling is induced by cocaine exposure itself, suggesting that our body has its own way to fight addiction.
Dong, the paper’s senior author, says that the pro-relapse response is predominant after cocaine exposure. But since the anti-relapse response exists inside the brain, it could possibly be clinically tweaked to achieve therapeutic benefits.
Ma notes that this finding “may provide insight into ways to manipulate this yin-yang balance and hopefully provide new neurobiological targets for interventions designed to decrease relapse.”
“The story won’t stop here,” Ma adds. “Our ongoing study is exploring some unusual but simple ways to beef up the endogenous anti-relapse mechanism.”
(Image: PA)

neurosciencestuff:

The Yin and Yang of Overcoming Cocaine Addiction

Yaoying Ma says that biology, by nature, has a yin and a yang—a push and a pull.

Addiction, particularly relapse, she finds, is no exception.

Ma is a research associate in the lab of Yan Dong, assistant professor of neuroscience in the University of Pittsburgh’s Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences. She is the lead author of a paper published online today in the journal Neuron that posits that it may be possible to ramp up an intrinsic anti-addiction response as a means to fight cocaine relapse and keep the wolves of relapse at bay.

This paper is the first to establish the existence of a brain circuitry that resists a relapse of cocaine use through a naturally occurring neural remodeling with “silent synapses.”

The work is a follow-up on a recent study conducted by Dong and his colleagues, which was published in Nature Neuroscience last November. The team used rat models to examine the effects of cocaine self-administration and withdrawal on nerve cells in the nucleus accumbens, a small region in the brain that is commonly associated with reward, emotion, motivation, and addiction. Specifically, they investigated the roles of synapses—the structures at the ends of nerve cells that relay signals.

The team reported in its Nature Neuroscience study that when a rat uses cocaine, some immature synapses are generated, which are called “silent synapses” because they are semifunctional and send few signals under normal physiological conditions. After that rat stops using cocaine, these “silent synapses” go through a maturation phase and acquire their full function to send signals. Once they can send signals, the synapses will send craving signals for cocaine if the rat is exposed to cues previously associated with the drug.

The current Neuron paper shows that there’s another side of “silent synapse” remodeling. Silent synapses that are generated in a specific cortical projection to the nucleus accumbens by cocaine exposure become “unsilenced” after cocaine withdrawal, resulting in a profound remodeling of this cortical projection. Additional experiments show that silent synapse-based remodeling of this cortical projection decreases cocaine craving. Importantly, this anti-relapse circuitry remodeling is induced by cocaine exposure itself, suggesting that our body has its own way to fight addiction.

Dong, the paper’s senior author, says that the pro-relapse response is predominant after cocaine exposure. But since the anti-relapse response exists inside the brain, it could possibly be clinically tweaked to achieve therapeutic benefits.

Ma notes that this finding “may provide insight into ways to manipulate this yin-yang balance and hopefully provide new neurobiological targets for interventions designed to decrease relapse.”

“The story won’t stop here,” Ma adds. “Our ongoing study is exploring some unusual but simple ways to beef up the endogenous anti-relapse mechanism.”

(Image: PA)


Dementors and House-elves, merpeople and Chinese Fireball Dragons—these are just a few of the magical creatures and frightening monsters populating J. K. Rowling’s wizarding world. Harry Potter: The Creature Vault is a fascinating look at how this menagerie was brought to life for the blockbuster Harry Potter film series. Detailed profiles of each creature include rare concept illustrations, behind-the-scenes photography, and filmmaking secrets from the Warner Bros. archive. A removable poster picturing each of the creatures and an interactive Eeylops Owl Emporium catalog complete this must-have package. 
On sale October 28, 2014 (x)

Dementors and House-elves, merpeople and Chinese Fireball Dragons—these are just a few of the magical creatures and frightening monsters populating J. K. Rowling’s wizarding world. Harry Potter: The Creature Vault is a fascinating look at how this menagerie was brought to life for the blockbuster Harry Potter film series. Detailed profiles of each creature include rare concept illustrations, behind-the-scenes photography, and filmmaking secrets from the Warner Bros. archive. A removable poster picturing each of the creatures and an interactive Eeylops Owl Emporium catalog complete this must-have package. 

On sale October 28, 2014 (x)

(Source: simplypotterheads, via thefairest-snowwhite)

shaburdies:

Senshi Study Sesh!

This was the piece I submitted to the Meatball Head Sailor Moon art show in LA at Meltdown Comics! The show was this past weekend and was curated by the wonderful Nico Colaleo, who had a bunch of amazing artists in the industry contribute to the show! I heard that it was a blast, and wish I could have been able to make it.

So many thanks to my friends Gyimah, Ben and Scott for helping me out! I have much to learn, but was eager to try something new with environment, perspective, and colours. The colours have been tweaked since, but otherwise the drawing is the same :)

I’ll post some close ups later! Enjoy!

(via thefairest-snowwhite)

The Rio Caño Cristales - most colorful river (caused by algae and moss seen through the water), Colombia.

(Source: weather.com, via thefairest-snowwhite)

(Source: rollingstone, via thefairest-snowwhite)

tefra:

Antonio Marras, Fall 2013

tefra:

Antonio Marras, Fall 2013

(via mer-cu-ri-al)

thedeathscorpion:

sjwstupidity:

aletolover:

wolf-peaches:

deutschemark:

regencyduchess:

Whilst in Sydney in 1994, a man apparently tries to assassinate Prince Charles. And not a single fuck was given by His Royal Highness.

(x)

I’m dead at his face in the last one like “Did you even try?”

And then when he gets pushed he’s like “Wait no let him try!”

But where did the bullets go? He doesn’t seem to have hit any bystanders either. Did he shoot straight up in the air? Did he shoot the floor twice? What the hell?

New South Wales premier was about to take one for the team.

(Source: shewolfofengland, via thefairest-snowwhite)

parachutesx:

sky-media:

this is my favorite line in the history of ahs

always

parachutesx:

sky-media:

this is my favorite line in the history of ahs

always

(via thefairest-snowwhite)

cooterie:

(via Space Dandy: Dandy (MegaHouse) Figure Review - Cooterie)

(via thefairest-snowwhite)

(Source: ricardosminaj, via thefairest-snowwhite)